GALA&AUCTION
2017

Jonathan Starch is the longtime Executive Producer of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” the Wolf Films/NBC television series (recently celebrating its 400th broadcast episode). He has also served as a director for the show, which stars Mariska Hargitay, Ice-T, Kelli Giddish, Peter Scanavino, and Raul Esparza. A graduate of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, he has worked on such independent films as “Igby Goes Down” and Julian Schnabel’s “Basquiat,” and has produced TV commercials all over the U.S., Europe, and the Far East. His work in primetime began with the legendary director Sidney Lumet on his landmark A&E series “100 Centre Street.” Other broadcast work includes the “Law & Order” spinoff “Criminal Intent” and the celebrated FX series “Lights Out.”

His first feature film as Producer, “Rhythm Thief,” took a special jury prize at Sundance, and his landmark Showtime Original feature film “Strange Justice,” about the Clarence Thomas SCOTUS nomination, landed him a Peabody Award. Jonathan is a member of the Director’s Guild, the Producer’s Guild, and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

David France is an Oscar-nominated filmmaker, New York Times best-selling author, and award-winning investigative journalist. His Sundance documentary “How to Survive a Plague” is hailed as an innovative and influential piece of storytelling that is credited with renewing a conversation about AIDS in the United States. That film went on to win a dozen awards including a Peabody, nominations for two Emmys, a Director’s Guild Award, an Independent Spirit Award, and an Academy Award nomination. More recently, Alfred A. Knopf published David’s deep history of AIDS activism, also called “How to Survive a Plague,” which made numerous “best books of the year” lists and won the ALA’s Stonewall Book Awards – Israel Fishman Nonfiction Award for 2017. The book is being adapted as a miniseries by the producer Scott Rudin for the Nat Geo network.

In addition, David has seen his journalistic work inspire several films, including the Peabody-winning Showtime film “Soldier’s Girl” and the Emmy-nominated “Our Fathers,” based on his critically acclaimed book by the same title. He is partner with Joy A. Tomchin in the social-justice and LGBT-focused production company Public Square Films, whose newest documentary, “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson,” premieres next month at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Jonathan and David, together since 1994, share homes in New York City’s East Village and Delaware County NY. Besides their long support for Bailey House, the couple has been pleased to support and volunteer for GMHC, ACRIA, The LGBT Center, Creative Time, and Housing Works, where David served as a board member for a dozen years. David is also a past honoree of Bailey House’s, having received the Key Award in 2012.

With a belief that everyone deserves equal economic, political and social rights, Patricia has devoted her entire career – spanning more than 30 years — to social justice work advising high net worth donors, producing events and conferences, creating fundraising campaigns and providing technical assistance; with experience in nonprofit, entrepreneurial and philanthropic settings.

In the late 1980’s at the height of the AIDS epidemic, she served as Director of Special Events for the Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) – raising more than $60 million for HIV/AIDS services and educational programs. In 1996 she founded Patricia Evert Productions, a strategic consultancy focused on events that transformed the New York City fundraising landscape by centering feminist, anti-racist, pro-immigrant arts and LGBT positive programming. Over the years her clients have included Alan Guttmacher Institute, Anti-Violence Project, Bailey House, Birch Services, Center for Arts Education, DIFFA, GLSEN, God’s Love We Deliver, Hetrick Martin Institute, International Rescue Committee (IRC), International Women’s Health Coalition (IWHC), NARAL Pro-Choice NY, National Council for Research on Women (NCRW), NEO Philanthropy, Population Council, Public Theatre, Save the Children, Tides Foundation, Union Settlement House, Women’s Commission and V-Day.

From 2005-2011 she served as the Vice President of Donor Resources for the Gill Foundation and was responsible for generating financial support for the LGBT civil rights movement. She produced the Gill Foundation’s highly regarded OutGiving conferences for LGBT and allied philanthropists, and in 2006 helped launch Political Outgiving for Gill Action Fund to help donors advance equality through legislative, political and electoral processes. At Gill and in her private practice, she was responsible for raising the financial support that helped to secure massive victories in support of LGBT people, including the freedom to marry.

In 2009 she co-authored the Business of Change resource guide that examined the changing paradigm of corporate philanthropy, and analyzed ways to maximize the social and business benefits of philanthropic programs.

In 2011 she returned to New York and continued her work as a consultant. Among her projects was the capital campaign for the NYC AIDS Memorial. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the NYC AIDS Memorial.

Throughout her career, Patricia has raised more than $250 million for progressive organizations.

 

LaQwanna Finkley, a junior at Lehman College, studies health education and promotion, with a focus on community health and African-American studies. LaQwanna is also currently doing field work for SCAN New York – working in the young adult internship program serving at-risk minority youth. Her focus is on helping young men and women who are not enrolled in school to obtain real-life work experience. Her dream is to get her master’s degree in social work, where she can work one-on-one with those in need to empower them to make healthy choices, to lead balanced, healthy lives, and to be a connector, bridging the gap between those in need and the services they seek. LaQwanna’s commitment to empowering marginalized individuals and fighting for social justice represents the spirit of the award she is receiving, and LaQwanna embodies the mission of Bailey House through her work and service. We are proud to honor her accomplishments.